Monday, November 24, 2014

Some Fun News

1--  I have been asked to contribute a story to the Timeless Romance Anthology and the cover has been released. Isn't is gorgeous? And look at those amazing authors that my name is next to! Pretty cool. It’ll come out in April 2015.



2-- I have a new cover for Silver Linings! In honor of Thanksgiving and having an updated cover, the ebook of Silver Linings will be on sale for 99 cents until Saturday. Here's the link to it on Amazon

                                                  

3-- My Christmas novella, Six Days of Christmas, is going to be a part of a 12 Days of Christmas Book Blitz event. Check out the other books a part of this (including one by NYT bestselling author Brenda Novak) and join the event! They’ll be giving away prizes, including books, up until the day before Christmas.




Hugs to all of you who read my blog and have bought my books, those who follow me on FB and Twitter and who follow my writing journey! I am thankful for all of you. 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!



Monday, November 10, 2014

Look Into My Eyes

 “When Jenny stepped in front of the oncoming truck, she saw the fear/horror/love/compassion/every single conceivable emotion ever felt by anyone ever in her brother’s eyes.” 

Image courtesy of Carlos Porto at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Are your characters eye readers?

Mine are.

They aren't mind readers, and they don't have a crystal balls, but I have found a real easy way around all that paranormal stuff when I'm drafting.

I just have my characters stare creepily into each others eyes, interpreting every hitch of the eyebrow, slight shifts of hue in their irises, and glints of light against their pupils in the exact right way.

And I'm not the only one who does this...

I know you've read scenes like this:
Eye Reading version:
His pupils dilate, and desire turns his ocean blue eyes to a deep indigo. I glance away, unable to hold his intense stare for too long. His gaze follows mine to the flier in my hand, and he lifts one eyebrow in challenge.

Interpretation: 
Him: "I am so attracted to you right now, I think I will give up everything important to me for the chance to be with you."
Her: "I don't know. Your crazy intense stare is kind of freaking me out, and I really want to save the whales."
Him: "I will be your whale."
-

Used here and there, eye reading is an effective way to show emotion without having to dissect everything with dialogue. It can be poignant and move a scene along quickly, as well as establishing a certain amount of intimacy between characters. Context is key with eye reading.

Do it too often though--or with the wrong character--and it gets cumbersome.

For example: I have a character in my current WIP who is so wrapped up in her own world, she's isolated herself from life, but the second she meets anyone new, you'd better believe she's reading their entire life history in their eyes.

So now I'm in the process of revising a good chunk of these instances in my current work in progress, and here's why:

1. It's a lazy way of conveying emotion.

2.It's telling instead of showing. It may not seem like it is (I'm *showing* the gleam in his eye...) but it's still just telling.

3. It's boring. Using my first example at the top, there are so many better, more interesting ways to express whatever emotion Jenny's brother feels right before she kills herself, other than XYZ in his eyes.

4. It can become too micro-descriptive and take the reader out of the narrative. We don't consciously notice every facial tick of the people around us, and our characters shouldn't either (unless they are like that guy from that Lie To Me show. Then it's okay.)
-

Any one else find themselves doing this in their writing?

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Editing is Where the Art Happens

Image courtesy of Simon Howden
at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
First drafts are crap.

At least mine are.

They are always full of meandering plot lines that either don’t go anywhere or turn ridiculous, characters with zero relevance, wordy descriptions or no descriptions at all, and people who talk and talk and TALK but don’t do anything.

I try not to let it bother me too much, because it might be a mess, but at least I have something to work with.

And that’s my favorite part. As much as I like drafting a shiny, brand new story, even more, I love revamping and polishing a story where I’ve gotten to know the characters, I have a better feel for themes, what’s at stake, and the overall tone I want to the book to have.

Then I get to go line by line and scene by scene and make it shine. I take out the cliché and overdone and boring, and try to make it interesting and beautiful.

I always like to say that this is where the art happens because it transcends functional writing and becomes something more.

So don’t stop writing before you get to this point! Don’t finish your first draft, or even your second, and think you’re done. I’ve heard so many agents say that one of the biggest mistakes people make is sending out their manuscripts too early. Don’t be that person that has a great book with a ton of potential, but just isn’t there yet.

Be patient. Let the shiny new idea sit tight for just a little bit longer.

Love your manuscript enough to make it shine.